1965 GMC 1000 Truck Project


#1

Hey guys. This is my 1965GMC 1000. This is my first ever “classic” vehicle and I probably got in over my head, having never done a whole lot of work on cars while growing up. It needs a lot of body/paint work and I have yet to decide exactly how I want ti to look when done. My first goal was just to get and keep it running reliably because I have always wanted a classic, but needed a truck; so, I bought a classic truck. Ha! I have a build thread here that covers the mechanical stuff I have had to learn and fix on this truck.
https://6066gmcclub.com/showthread.php?t=48103
There is a ton I do not know so this whole thing has been a learning curve. I’ll recap some things I have done here.
This is the truck when I bought it:
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My wife said my daughter could not ride in it without seat belts. So, instead of making holes to mount aftermarket belts, I swapped the worn out bench
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for seats out of a late model GMC truck that had the integrated belts
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My paint work so far has been rattle can work. Anything I pulled off the engine, I repainted back to teh GMC red it was supposed to be instead of the orange somone else had put on it.
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Except the valve covers. I had a little fun with those. Later my wife hand painted the letters GMC red for me. though not shown here.
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I also refinished the instrument panel. I had my wife hand paint the silver trim for me.
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The truck was missing a tailgate. Being on a tight budget, I built one out of wood I had lying around instead of buying an NOS or reproduction one.
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I hated the bumper that was on teh truck, so I finally found one to replace it. That thick steal took a lot of heat, hammering and pressing to manipulate in teh few spots that needed it. My first exposure to any type of body work.
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Rattled canned the headlight grill surround and headlight buckets since I had to replace some parts in that assembly. POR_15’d the back side of the bumper and the floor pans of the interior.
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And finally added some late model GMC wheels…again due to budget. They were a lot cheaper than the popular aftermarkets.

So that is my playing around, a little bit at a time for the last four years. Most of that was done little by little during the first year. Since then it has been hauling mulch, river rock, furniture, etc.; and going to some local car/truck shows for fun.

It has a long way to go, but I still enjoy it as is.


#2

FYI - if you are not in a rush and have rusted metal you want to treat, I tried this Molasses and water combo (9:1 ration I think) on the bumper brackets for the rear bumper. It sat for two weeks while I was working on other stuff, but came out good I thought. The molasses only attacks the rust, not harming the good metal.

Before
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During
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After
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#3

@ahaynes106 Wow, Molasses and water. Did not know that. Great post, keep on it :+1:t3:


#4

Yeah, it’s slow, but only attacks the bad metal. I think some people use a vinegar solution that is much faster, but I think it attacks good and bad metal. Since I had time, I gave it a try. It got in the pitted areas real good.


#5

I have heard of using coke but I guess this is quicker, concentrated coke material


#6

Looks like a good restoration project for sure.


#7

Love that tailgate. Looks like you are a woodworker too and your wife has a steady hand with a brush. You might have to call on her when you’re ready for pinstripes down the side or flames or something.


#8

Like everything else, I dabble in woodwork. I never seem to master anything. My dad can make anything. I managed to pick up a little from him while handing him his tools my youth. LOL.

I bought my wife an airbrush last Mother’s day. She seems to think I had ulterior motives with that gift. Ha ha!


#9

Looks great, keep up the good work-- and definitely keep us up to date. Did you replace the speedometer gauge or somehow restore it?? And how did you know or manage to get a late model GMC truck seat into this vehicle?


#10

Thanks. One of the guys from the GMC forum found a place that made vinyl decals that look like the original face. So, I just cleaned up the original speedo and laid the decal over it. It looked real good I thought. The other two gauges I just cleaned up and reinstalled.

It turns out the 40/20/40 seat out of early 2000’s, up to 2006, king cab GMC/Chevy 1500 fit real good from a width and depth perspective. The 20 portion in the center straddled the trans tunnel nicely fortunately. I lined up what original mounting locations I could, the ones in the rear, then I had to make some new mounting points for the front bolts and fashion some standoffs with square steel tubing. I will try to add a pic of that later. Because the back of the seats are thicker than the original bench, the space between the seat and large steering wheel is less. If I gain to much wait, it could become an issue. :wink:


#11

Looking good ahaynes 106!!,

Love the classics, and don’t care about fuel economy!

Wish my wife would help me, On her car (mine) I have to refuel (even though I mainly use my resto project), tax it, insure it, clean it, and pay for anything else… tyres, exhaust, brakes etc, she doesn’t know how to open bonnet (hood in US).

Your a lucky guy!!

Paul


#12

Well, I guess you could think of the new seats as a great way to stick to your diet…regarding the standoffs with square steel tubing, I’m having a bit of trouble visualizing that, could you explain (or maybe if you have a link to a picture) a bit more what you did?

BTW, the aftermarket GMC wheels look terrific here, really dress things up-- the original hubcaps made it look a bit like an elongated Ford Falcon.


#13

Hey Ahaynes 106, just wanted to pop in and say looks great so far . Love the woodwork. That gives me some ideas for some future projects thanks. Keep posting pics as you go forward on the truck . Love the classic cars and trucks. Hoping to get my hands on a 57’ T Bird to restore. Be watching for updates again great job.


#14

Thanks. Good luck once you find a T’Bird. Would love to see build thread on that when you get started!


#15

@larryq - I’ll try to get a pic or two soon. I forgot to yesterday.


#16

ahaynes 106 mean kenny here wow you are on the wright path is that motor a 348. everything looks rite on i have a 86 c10 motor 68 350 4bolt promax heads 500 thumper cam 670 holley only! wood tail gate was not budget it is one off. i have to aircraft strip mine i let a x pal paint that didn,t follow the rules.that,s why i became a vip senior student. always wear safety equipment. it aint a 1940 ford but you beat the torino for second place coolest project. mk w ky.


#17

Ha hs! Thanks! The engine is GMC’s 305e big block v6.
http://6066gmcguy.com/gmcv6a.html


#18

I have since acquired an actual GMC tailgate, but I kind of like the wood one…at least until it wears out.


#19

Ahaynes106, I agree with you on the wood tailgate . It looks really good. Keep the other as a spare lol


#20

ron hey mean kenny here do you know bounce ala. my son found a 89 chevy truck on facebook the 2 tone brown one. we are thinking about going and get it. if you know where a 2500 90s chevy truck is let me know. i have a 350 i built to go in it. so it doesn,t have to run. we can fix anything.