Painting over old basecoat or prime it into existing clear?


#1

Ok so on my 1997 Dodge Ram SS/T project I am doing there are areas on the tops of the front fenders and doors where the clear coat has delaminated I removed all of the damaged clear with 320 grit back into the adjacent good clear on the panel. Everything is smooth and feather edged and then I went over the entire fender with 400 grit wet. It looks great and feels perfect for reapplication of new base coat over the whole fender and then clear. The question I have is, do I have to prime over the old basecoat area that was under the damaged clear? I really don’t want to prime if I don’t have to but I also want to do this right and I heard Tony say in other videos, “you have to prime over the feather edged areas to seal it.” Let me know what you guys think and as always Thanks!


#2

Yes, unfortunately, you need to prime over feather edge. It helps it to, one, not lift or wrinkle when the solvent hits it and secondly, it helps to level the low spot that you’ve created by sanding away material. The low may not be very visible when you initially wet it, but you will see it once it’s top coated and shiny.

We’re not talking about priming like you would over filler, just a seal coat that you can block with 400. Good luck!


Painting over old basecoat with no remaining clearcoat?
#3

Ok cool. I’m glad I asked. I have been using a Matrix System epoxy primer that you can mix to fill, surface or seal depending on how much reducer you add. I will mix it for a sealer and just shoot it over the areas I removed the clear and overlap into the good scuffed clear at my feather edge. What do you recommend as far as how many coats of sealer before I blend it with 400 wet?


#4

As long as your feather edge is good and flat, two coats of sealer or one good coat of primers should do it. If you’ve feathered because the clear was delaminating, a medium wet coat and a good flash time over that area first is recommended in case it decides to start to wrinkle.


#5

Yeah part of the fenders clear was delaminating. So I just removed the rest of the checked up and cracking bad clear and feathered edged the clear into the area of the existing (now exposed) base coat.

Which brings me to another question. Let’s say for the roof of this truck where there is really bad sun damage. If I remove all of the clear and just get down to good clean existing basecoat where there is no feather edge, can you apply fresh base coat followed by clear right over the old base? I’m just trying to get a better understanding of what can be applied over the old (but sanded and clean) base coat.


#6

Really the only thing that you can just sand and reapply paint over, is a good hardened base. Any damaged paint whether it’s chalky, delaminated or badly faded will need to have a sealer, at very least, between it and the new paint. You may say forget that and just paint it and it may work out fine, for a while, best practice is to seal old paint before new. Especially base / clear.


#7

Understood and thank you again for taking the time to reply to my post. As I am prepping this truck my OCD was kicking in and I just hate the idea of putting more primer over old paint and just having all these layers on top of each other.